Beauty & Bondage

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012
Aestheticism can be defined as a philosophical position in which aesthetic values are placed in the foreground of human experience. The Aesthete saw art as a supreme good in itself, not (as John Ruskin or William Morris believed) as a means to make us all better people. Whistler declared that “art should stand alone and appeal to the artistic sense of eye or ear, without confounding this with emotions entirely foreign to it, as devotion, pity, love, patriotism”. The French critic Théophile Gautier succinctly referred to “Art for Art’s Sake”.

To be continued…

—GT

 

 

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